106 - Nine lessons I learned creating podcasts

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The questions tickled me. Back in 2015, I announced that I was shutting down my Free Photo Webinars and starting a podcast instead. My webinars had run for four years — on second Tuesday night of every month. We had great photographers join us to show their work and tell their stories. I had a fairly loyal following, so they were probably puzzled that I wanted to shift.

“Why in the world would you want to start a podcast?”

“Do you really want to replace a monthly requirement with a weekly one?”

“Isn’t photography a visual medium?”

I had a feeling this was something worth trying, but I didn’t know what to expect.

By the time I paused it to go work for Canon, I was firmly a fan. This was one of the better decisions I had made for my business.

Now that I’ve rebooted with EOS Photographer, I got the same questions again. I thought I’d answer them here.

 

Believe it or not, podcasting can be a great tool for any photography or photography education business.

 

Listen to the episode

 
If you are thinking that you don’t know where to start, I just made it easy for you. I created a downloadable podcasting checklist. It takes you through all the steps you need to take to create your own podcast. I even have a shopping list of all the hardware and software you need to purchase. Click to download.

If you are thinking that you don’t know where to start, I just made it easy for you. I created a downloadable podcasting checklist. It takes you through all the steps you need to take to create your own podcast. I even have a shopping list of all the hardware and software you need to purchase. Click to download.

1. You can form a deeper connection with clients and followers. If you think about it, people spend more time with you on a podcast than they would on any other kind of platform. You might read or skim an article for a few minutes. Most videos bore you after 5 minutes.

In a podcast, you get to have what’s basically a 1 to 1 with your listener. And you get to have longer conversations. Over time that helps you form a deeper relationship. I know when I listen to a person weekly for 30-45 minutes, on some level, I feel like I know them.

2. It extends your reach beyond your typical communities. The cool thing about podcasts is you have free syndication. Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher. All these distribution channels broadcast your show to their listeners. And it doesn’t cost you anything. iTunes is the third largest search engine in the world. You want to be where they are looking. Podcasts bring you an audience that is diverse, educated, and affluent — 22% of listeners have household incomes more than $100,000. My last survey was pretty consistent with these results.

3. It gives you a platform to answer the questions large numbers of your followers might have. Use your episodes to answer the questions you hear frequently. If three people ask me the same question, I start thinking about how I can make an episode out of it. Chances are many other people could have the same question. Now you can serve many people rather than just individuals.

4. It is easy to let your personality shine. You know that sometimes, it is hard to get a sense of someone from a text. When you hear them, it’s easier to connect with their personality.

5. Podcasting helps you build the trust necessary for large sales. Midroll says 61% report buying something they heard about on a podcast ad. I found it was easier to sell my weekend workshops once I started my podcast. The trust issues I had to overcome earlier went away. People would buy without asking any questions.

6. Your audience can listen anywhere & while multitasking. Midroll podcast ad agency says 40% of their audiences listen while walking, running, or biking. They report 52% listen in the car; 46% listen while traveling; 32% listen while they work out.

7. It is a relatively small investment. You can be up and running for less than $200. Think about that. You are broadcasting your message around the world for less than the cost of an entry level lens.

8. It is a simple production requirement. If you go video, to scale up, you’ll need a production team. You’ll need a camera person, maybe a sound person, an assistant. With a podcast, you can do the entire thing by yourself and have radio production quality.

9. It has impacted me and my photography (TFTTF, Photofocus, TWIP, Ted Forbes - The Art of Photography | Today I’m inspired by Jenna Martin, Rick Sammon, B&H, Candid Frame).

 

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